#LetsMoveCanada – National Health and Fitness Day!

FITNESS

Get out and get active to celebrate National Health and Fitness Day on June 3rd at your local MOVATI Athletic club.

Jayde Kabeya, our Group Fitness Education National Manager has challenged you! Take part in her AMRAP CHALLENGE. How many rounds can you complete in 5 minutes!?

Complete the four workouts below and share your experience on social media using the hashtag #MOVATIMovesCanada #LetsMoveCanada .

AMRAP CHALLENGE

10 Squat Jumps

8 Dumbbell Shoulder Presses

6 Goblet Squats

4 Push ups

To learn more about National Health and Fitness Day, check out the Fitness Industry Council of Canada website: https://ficdn.ca/

OPTIMIZE YOUR WORKOUT RECOVERY WITH MOBILITY AND STRETCHING

FITNESS

After a long week of workouts, it is important to make sure we are taking care of our bodies by properly recovering. How do we do that?! With a recovery and mobility workout! In order to make the most out of all the hard work you put into working out, a recovery workout is a must!

WHAT IS A RECOVERY WORKOUT?

It is a common belief that a recovery day is a rest day, meaning you do not need to do any kind of workout that day. This is NOT the case!  On a recovery day, you should still be doing a workout, although it is a different kind of workout, typically focusing on mobility and flexibility. This workout is typically relaxed and requires only a small amount of time. This recovery workout is meant to help flush out any soreness in the muscles and release lactic acid after a tough week of training. It is focusing on hip mobility, back mobility, as well as adductors.

SHIN BOX

The shin box is a fun hip mobility exercise I first learned in jiu-jitsu training to help prepare the hips for a lot of movement and muscle activation while rolling.

But beyond that, the shin box is the perfect way to work on your hip mobility and loosen up tight hips from your workouts or from time spent sitting during the day.

The movement involves internal and external rotation of the hips, which is crucial to help you avoid rounding your lower back during exercises like squats. It also helps improve your range of motion, making your workouts more effective.

  • Sit on the floor with one leg in front, bent at the knee.
  • Your back leg will also be bent at the knee, facing backward, with your foot facing away from you.
  • Some prefer the foot to touch the knee, while others need an open stance. See which works for you.
  • Swivel your hips, starting with your back knee and allowing your front knee to follow.
  • Your knees will come off the ground and swivel across like a windshield wiper, grounding your heels and lifting your knees up, and rotating them across your body.
  • At this point, you will be back into the starting position but on the opposite side with the opposite knee in front.
  • Practice this swivel a few times.
  • Next, try to lift your hips and glutes off the floor after a swivel, raising into a kneeling position at the top.
  • Control your body weight to lower and swivel up onto the opposite side.
  • Repeat for 10 repetitions on each side.

BIRD DOG

Bird dogs are a practical exercise that moves several areas of your body, but getting the technique just right is essential. Done correctly, the bird dog will help you work on torso stability and core bracing, which are vital for improving your deadlift, squat, and other movements.

Doing this movement on your recovery days can help you avoid losing stability in your core and spine during lifting days. The result? Less pain, better performance, and way less likelihood of injury.

Moreover, bird dogs are renowned for boosting recovery from back pains and strains and are recommended in a paper by Dr. Stuart McGill(opens in new tab), one of the world’s top back and spine researchers.

This exercise is one of his “Big Three” movements for the back and core, used by physiotherapists and pain-free performance specialists (like myself) for clients with lower back tightness.

It looks easy, but the goal is to make it feel challenging. To do this, you must tense your entire body and keep yourself steady.

  • Start on the floor on all fours, with your wrists stacked under your shoulders and knees under your hips.
  • Stiffen your torso by contracting the muscles in your back, abs, glutes, shoulders, and hips.
  • With your lower back stiffened, extend your right arm and left leg very slowly.
  • Keep your foot about two to four inches off the floor, not raised super high behind you, so that you can keep your hips level without your back arching.
  • Keep your lower back stiff and make a fist with your extended arm.
  • With a stiff body, hold this position for 10 seconds.
  • Slowly bring your leg back underneath you along with your fist, touching your knee to your fist if you can. Do not allow your back to relax; keep it stiff.
  • Raise back up to the extended position.
  • Try five reps of 10-second holds on each side. Gradually add reps as you improve.

T-SPINE ROTATIONAL LUNGE

Our bodies aren’t designed to sit for long periods each day, so it can cause problems in your upper back and spine, often leading to muscular imbalances, weakness, and tightness across your body.

Depending on your job and habits, your shoulders may feel tight and have a limited range of motion, with one side being worse than the other. To help reduce these impacts, you can try this rotational lunge.

It incorporates the t-spine and helps stretch the lower back, hips, and hip flexors. You can hold a kettlebell (opens in new tab) in one arm for this movement or use body weight.

  • Start on the floor kneeling, then place one leg in front in a lunge, foot flat on the floor, and knee bent 90 degrees.
  • Hold a kettlebell in a racked position up by your shoulder, if using, in the same arm as your bent front knee. This will help improve shoulder stability.
  • Slowly twist toward your front knee, rotating your torso while keeping your back straight.
  • Use your free hand to grasp the outside of your raised knee, gently pulling yourself to encourage a deeper rotational stretch.
  • Hold for five seconds.
  • Try performing this movement two or three times on each side.

PRONE COBRA

The cobra is a popular yoga pose that helps open your shoulders, but this prone cobra variation adds in an isometric hold, which means holding a contracted position for a certain amount of time.

Isometric holds help build muscle and strength by combining your body weight and time under tension (the amount of time you hold the move).

It’s a corrective exercise that can help address poor posture and Upper Cross Syndrome, a common condition in people who sit for long periods.

  • Lay on the floor on your stomach with your arms by your sides.
  • Lift your chest off the floor, keeping your chin down.
  • Then, lift your arms off the floor and contract your core and back muscles to stay lifted.
  • Try moving your palms to face away from you from here, pointing your thumbs upward if you can.
  • Otherwise, you can keep your palms flat facing upward or turn them down if you don’t have the mobility to rotate your shoulders this way.
  • Try to get your thumbs pointing up over time to increase the openness of your shoulders.
  • Hold for about 30 seconds, then rest on the floor for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat for six rounds so that you will have held the contraction for three minutes by the end.

RESISTANCE BAND PULL-APART

Resistance bands (opens in new tab) are an excellent tool for recovery day workouts. They come in various resistance levels and provide tension that will help gently activate muscles without adding fatigue.

The banded pull-apart is excellent as a warm-up exercise for upper body training and as part of a recovery workout to combat Upper Cross Syndrome.

This exercise will help stretch and strengthen the upper back and shoulders. You can do it with palms facing up or down as both hit different areas of your back and shoulders in unique, beneficial ways.

  • Hold a light resistance band with an underhand grip in both hands, spaced slightly wider than shoulder width. Just ensure you will have band tension at the end position of the exercise.
  • Bring the band to chest height and separate your hands, pulling and stretching the band to increase resistance.
  • Bring the band to touch your chest, separating your arms to your sides as far as possible. Don’t allow your elbows to bend or your arms to rotate during the movement.
  • Squeeze your shoulder blades back and together to feel the contraction. Hold for up to five seconds, then slowly reverse the motion.
  • Repeat 15 to 20 times.

HIP FLEXOR LEG LIFT

Your hip flexors are a muscle group (iliacus, psoas, pectineus, rectus femoris, and sartorius) located at the front of your hips and thighs that assist with flexing your hip or raising your knee upward toward your body.

They can become very tight due to sitting, leading to back pain and poor performance in movements such as squats. Strengthening your hip flexors combats the effects of sitting, improves mobility, and can help reduce your risk of injury.

  • Sit on the floor, legs extended in front of you, with a kettlebell or another obstacle several inches high beside your ankle.
  • Raise your arms out to the sides for balance and sit upright.
  • Lift one leg up and over the kettlebell, then down to touch the floor on the other side.
  • Reverse the motion by lifting back up and over.
  • Repeat 15 to 20 times, then switch sides.

PLATE SHOULDER MOBILITY DRILL

Shoulders are notoriously troublesome and can become injury prone or dysfunctional relatively easily. This is because our shoulders have a great range of motion, but it can be challenging if you don’t have stability.

This shoulder mobility drill uses light 2.5lb weight plates to increase shoulder mobility and stability during your recovery day workout and combats the effects of sitting while strengthening your shoulders.

If you don’t have a weight plate to hand, you can either do the move without weights or grab a couple of full water bottles or canned foods instead.

  • Lay on your stomach on the floor with a 2.5lb weight plate in each hand.
  • Bend your elbows at shoulder height with the plates in your hands and elbows at 90 degrees.
  • Slowly straighten and extend your arms to move the plates away from you, arms overhead.
  • Don’t allow the weight plates to touch the floor and keep your arms hovering above the floor.
  • Reverse the motion to return to the bent arm position.
  • Repeat 10 times.

Join MOVATI Today and get Started with this Special Offer. Already a member? Get customized programming and improve your mobility and recovery by consulting with one of our Personal Trainers in club and complete your Game Plan Session or join seminars with one of our fitness professionals.

Story Credit: Toronto FC Training Staff

MARATHON TRAINING TIPS

MARATHON TRAINING TIPS
FITNESS

Looking to maximize your marathon training? Here’s are some tips to make your 26.2 mile journey a healthy and happy one.

Training for a marathon involves adapting your body to the demands of 26.2 miles of running. To get it right, you need to increase your cardiovascular fitness and endurance, as well as your ability to conserve and manage energy during the race. All this needs to be done while respecting your recovery so you don’t burn out.

What’s the best training plan?

The marathon is a long way, and your training needs to reflect that. Variety of training is important, as is making sure you have a training plan that prepares you specifically for the marathon, but for most runners, getting out the door and running at an easy and steady effort, with a good frequency and consistency, is what will get you ready. The most effective training plan is one you can stick to and enjoy. It is far better to get in four to five runs, week in, week out, than six runs one week and nothing the next.

Go long, but not too long

While it is important to have banked good time on feet, if you go too far in your long runs, you’ll struggle to recover and then you will start your marathon already tired. Three hours to 3:15 is as long as your longest run needs to be and, for many, 2:30-2:45 is enough, three to four weeks out from race day. Any more than that and you risk not recovering in time. For more tips on the long run, click here.

Spread the load

But if you’re limiting the length or duration of your longest run, how can you be confident of handling the distance? The long run is critical, but your overall volume of training is even more important. Four to five runs a week is a good target, while any additional cross-training will boost your fitness. Consider a midweek run that also builds in volume, up to 75-90 minutes, to supplement your weekend long run.

Practice close to race pace

Easy running is important as you build up your training volume. But as you get close to your marathon, there’s a benefit in doing some of your long runs closer to race pace rather than the typically recommended 60-75 seconds a mile slower. In the final eight to 10 weeks

of your schedule, try long runs at a steadier pace, averaging 15-30 seconds a mile slower than your goal race pace.

Pace yourself

When the gun goes, you need to know what pace you’ll be running. Adding marathon-pace sections to the end of some long runs is a great mental and physical stimulus. A good peak long run might be 2:45-3:00, including four sets of 20 minutes at goal marathon pace, with five-minute recoveries.

There are a few ways to estimate your marathon time based on your performances across other distances. Multiplying your 10K PB by five, then subtracting 10 minutes, is one option; doubling your half-marathon time and adding 10-20 minutes or working out 105-108 per cent of your half-marathon time also work. Or you add a recent performance in another distance into a race time predictor like this.

Stress your system

The marathon is a game of energy preservation. Much of what you are aiming to achieve with training is teaching the body to be good at using fuel. One way you can do this is with sessions that vary efforts between predominately using stored fats or carbohydrate. Try this: embedded in a 75-90 minute run, alternate between three to five minutes at around 10K race pace and three to five minutes at, or just slower than, marathon pace, with no rest. Start with 30 minutes of this and aim to build up to around 60 minutes as the weeks progress.

Cross-train

Running is high-impact. In recent years, we have seen great examples of elite athletes performing at the highest level while including lots of non-running training. Time spent on a bike or elliptical trainer, or even aqua-jogging, can be hugely effective in developing your fitness. Convert your running sessions to time and perceived effort and they can be conducted as cross-training, which increases your training volume while minimizing injury risk.

Hit the hills

Hill training can be a great way of doing ‘speedwork in disguise’, as you’ll very quickly see your heart rate jumping up while also developing more strength in your glutes, hamstrings and quads. Challenge yourself by taking one of your midweek runs over a hilly route and working stretches of uphill at a strong sustained effort, where you stay tall and light on your feet, and drive your arms strongly.

Train your gut

Fueling on the run is a good way to ensure you get to the final 10km of the marathon feeling strong and ready to hold your pace. But you need to practice your race-day fueling strategy. Gels help to get energy quickly into your body on the run; sip your gel gradually over three to four minutes, and target one gel every 30 minutes or so during the race. If you struggle with gels, ensure you try a range of other options well in advance of your taper.

Work on your strength

Runners who can hold their posture and technique will find it far easier to maintain their pace in the final stages of a marathon. Strength training is all too often neglected by runners, even though it can boost performance. Use one or two sessions a week to focus on strength, with exercises such as split squats (shown below), single-leg squats and bridges, as well as core work such as planks and side planks.

LIFESTYLE

Your body gets fitter through stress and recovery. You need to work your body hard and go beyond your current comfort zones to build fitness, but it’s not until you recover that all of the beneficial adaptations take place. So, managing your lifestyle is key to a successful marathon campaign. Paula Radcliffe has some great tips on how to make small changes.

Monitor your health and energy

Your marathon training doesn’t just sit in isolation. Your work, family and social life will affect your ability to train and recover well. Keep an eye out for the warning signs of ‘under-recovery’. You can monitor your day-to-day training readiness with a HRV [heart-rate variability] app, and watch for inconsistent sleep, regular small colds or niggles, or a loss of motivation. Be prepared to change your plan around busy periods and work or family-life stresses.

Sleep yourself fitter

A critical element of adaptation is getting enough recovery and sleep. We have all heard of the magical ‘eight hours’ but, in truth, the quality and continuity of your sleep is just as important. Create a cool, calm and dark environment to sleep in, try to avoid using your phone in the final 60 minutes before bed and aim for a consistent sleep and wake-up time.

Freshen up

Constantly pushing a little harder each week will often result in your peaking too early, or getting overtrained or injured. Break your training down into smaller chunks – this can help you manage the balance between work and recovery. Every three to four weeks, include a lighter week of training (also known as a recovery or ‘down’ week), cutting back your volumes by about a third to allow your body a bit more adaptation time. Respect your rest days and recovery weeks – your body will reward you.

Eat for energy

Good nutrition will see you hitting your runs feeling more motivated and energized, but will also help you to adapt to the training more effectively. A balanced diet, with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, and including whole-food groups, should be a starting point to fuel your training and your recovery. Aim for 4g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight on days before your key hard sessions or long runs. After your sessions, take on food or a shake with a 3:1 ratio of carbs to protein within a 20-40-minute window of finishing.

Enjoy yourself!

Running is something we choose to do – no one forces us to enter a marathon. You learn a lot about yourself through the course of marathon training, so enjoy the process. Stay social – the joy of running with others has been limited in the last year. Sharing some long runs with other runners can make all the difference.

MINDSET

The marathon involves a leap of faith. The fact that few runners will cover the distance in training before race day means the mental side of training becomes even more important. There are a variety of methods you can deploy to cope with the mental demands of a marathon.

Respect, don’t fear

Don’t fear the marathon. This can lead you to make poor decisions and to try to progress too far, too fast, too soon. Your goal is to arrive at race day healthy and energized, so respect the distance, but recognize it is achievable. Build your training in gradual increments and set small training goals, lifestyle goals and strength goals for each three-week block. The more goals you hit, the more the marathon will start to feel possible.

Focus on the positives

Marathon training is a journey and progress is not always smooth and linear. There will be workouts that don’t go to plan, races where you don’t feel great and runs that you need to miss or reschedule. As the weeks go by, make sure you focus on positive outcomes – it’s about what you do complete, not what you don’t. Keep a training diary and note down two or three positives every week, runs that went well, conditioning you completed or an improvement in your nutrition. If something hasn’t worked, note what you learned from that experience and make changes.

Rehearse race day

Feeling psychologically primed and ready is a key weapon in your armory. Race day should feel familiar; this will allow you to stay calm and focused. Aim to mimic your planned race-day routine in a couple of your key long runs – run at the time the race starts, wear your race-day kit and have your planned race-day breakfast. If you can, aim to complete a race during your training (a half marathon is ideal), as this will get you used to running around other people and pacing sensibly.

Improve your mental skills

The marathon is a long race – your mind may wander and doubts may creep up on you as the miles go by. Use you training to build your toolkit of mental skills to use on race day. Practice different positive self-talk strategies in training – these could be focused on relaxation (‘breathe and relax your shoulders’), technique (‘keep your leg speed snappy’) or focus (‘pull in that vest in front’).

These are just a few of the many tips to make your marathon training a success.

Join MOVATI Today and get Started with This Special Offer. Already a member? To customize programming and help you improve your training, consult with one of our Personal Trainers in club and complete your Game Plan Session or join seminars with one of our fitness professionals. 

Story Credit: University of California San Francisco Health

Choose your side and workout like Adonis Creed or Damian Anderson from Creed 3

Choose your side and workout like Adonis Creed or Damian Anderson from Creed 3
FITNESS

With another installment of the Rocky franchise ready to hit the big screen on March 3, 2023, Michael B. Jordan steps into the ring for the third time as Adonis Creed and Jonathan Majors makes his debut in Creed III as Damian Anderson. The two actors are set to square off in the ring but put in a crazy amount of work in the gym to pack on the muscle for their respective rolls. 

Depending on who you are cheering on, here are the workouts that each actor did to transform themselves into the physical boxing specimens you will witness on the big screen. 

Jonathan Majors as Damian Anderson

Straight Arm Lat Pulldown

  • 3 sets
  • 10 reps

Close Grip Pullups

  • 3 sets
  • 10 to 12 reps

Leg Raises

  • 3 sets
  • 8 to 10 reps

Oblique Knee Raise

  • 3 sets
  • 8 reps

One-Arm Dumbbell Row

  • 3 sets
  • 12 reps per arm

Dumbbell Shrugs

  • 3 sets
  • 12 reps

Overhead press

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 10

Pullups & Chin-ups

  • Sets – 4
  • Reps – 12

Dumbbell Bench Press

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Kettlebell goblet squats

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 10
  • Rest – 60 seconds

Forward Lunge

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 8
  • Rest – 1 minute

Hip Thrusts

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 10
  • Rest – 60 seconds

Michael B. Jordan as Adonis Creed

DAY I

Chest, back & arms

Incline Dumbbell Press 

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Dumbbell Fly

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Pushups

  • Sets – 10
  • Reps – 1-10

Dumbbell Kickback

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 15

Triceps Pushdown

  • Sets – 2
  • Reps – 20
  • Bench Dip
  • Sets – 10
  • Reps – 1-10

DAY II

Biceps, triceps & lats

One-Arm Dumbbell Row

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Neutral-Grip Pulldown

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Bent Over Row

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Dumbbell Curl

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Barbell Curl

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Hammer Curl

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

DAY III

Legs + abs Circuit

Dumbbell Lunge

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 30 SEC. (EACH LEG)

Single-Leg Hip Extension

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 15 SEC. (EACH LEG)

Leg Curl

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Romanian Deadlift

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Squat

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Crunch Swiss Ball

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 25

Leg Raise

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 25

Toe Touch Med. Ball

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 25

DAY IV

Chest, arms & abs

Sprinter Situp

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 25

Reverse Crunch Resistance Band

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 25

Dumbbell Bench Press

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 15

Bench Dip

  • Sets – 4
  • Reps – 20

Dumbbell Flye

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 25

To customize programming and help you look like your best version of Michael B. Jordan or Jonathan Majors, consult with one of our Personal Trainers in club and complete your Game Plan Session.

You can’t run from your past!

Story Credit: Men’s Health (https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/a41576163/jonathan-majors-workout/ & https://www.menshealth.com/entertainment/a41568343/jonathan-majors-creed-3-body-transformation/) Insider (https://www.insider.com/michael-b-jordan-creed-3-workout-routine-diet-trainer-2023-1) 

Train like a Warrior and Conquer your Workout to Look like the New Big Bad of the MCU

Train like a Warrior and Conquer your Workout to Look like the New Big Bad of the MCU
FITNESS

Phase 5 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) is officially kicking off this month with the release of Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania. Unlike past MCU movies where the focus is on the protagonist, this new phase will focus and build a story around the antagonist who will make Thanos (the previous MCU antagonist from phase 3) look like a piece of cake. Who is this antagonist you may ask … none other than Kang the Conqueror portrayed by Jonathan Majors.

Majors made his MCU debut as He Who Remains—a multiversal variant of Kang the Conqueror—in Loki Season 1. Fast forward to February 17th, 2023, and audiences will see the commitment Majors’ made to this role putting on 10 pounds of muscle to prepare and transform his body to look like an imposing figure.

How did he accomplish this, you may ask? By waking up at 4:30 a.m. and hitting the gym, then going back to the gym at 7 p.m. This is one of Majors’ workout routines (back focused) that got him ripped:

Straight Arm Lat Pulldown

  • 3 sets
  • 10 reps

Close Grip Pullups

  • 3 sets
  • 10 to 12 reps

Leg Raises

  • 3 sets
  • 8 to 10 reps

Oblique Knee Raise

  • 3 sets
  • 8 reps

One-Arm Dumbbell Row

  • 3 sets
  • 12 reps per arm

Dumbbell Shrugs

  • 3 sets
  • 12 reps

Overhead press

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 10

Pullups & Chin-ups

  • Sets – 4
  • Reps – 12

Dumbbell Bench Press

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 12

Kettlebell goblet squats

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 10
  • Rest – 60 seconds

Forward Lunge

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 8
  • Rest – 1 minute

Hip Thrusts

  • Sets – 3
  • Reps – 10
  • Rest – 60 seconds

To customize programming and help you look like your best version of the new big bad of the MCU, consult with one of our Personal Trainers in club and complete your Game Plan Session.

For all time, always!

Story Credit: Men’s Health (https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/a41576163/jonathan-majors-workout/ & https://www.menshealth.com/entertainment/a41576725/jonathan-majors-kang-the-conqueror-warrior-workout/)

12 Days of Yoga

12 Days of Yoga
FITNESS

Who said the holiday season is the wrong time to practice yoga? There’s no wrong time to de-stress yourself with some stretching, meditation and breath control. Roll out your mat and add these 12 poses to your practice.

Don’t do them all at once. Try one pose each day of the festive season to let your body and mind gradually soak up the holiday spirit!

Day 1: A Partridge in a Pear Tree

Tree Pose

Tree Pose

 

Day 2: Turtle Doves

Warrior 2

Turtle Doves

Day 3: French Hens

Warrior 3

Warrior 3

Day 4: Calling Birds

Plank – lift up each of your 4 limbs one at a time Or Crow Pose

Plank – lift up each of your 4 limbs one at a time Or Crow Pose

Day 5: Golden Rings

Wheel

Wheel

Day 6: Geese a Laying

Pigeon

Pigeon

Day 7: Swans a Swimming

Cobra

Cobra

Day 8: Maids a Milking

Cow Face Pose

Cowface

Day 9: Ladies Dancing

Dancer’s Pose

Dancer's Pose

Day 10: Lords a Leaping

Standing Split or Hand to Big Toe

Day 11: Pipers Piping

Close twist crescent lunge with hands mimicking a pipe

Pipers Piping

Day 12: Drummers Drumming

Warrior 1

Warrior 1

Staying on Track During the Holiday Season

Staying on Track During the Holiday Season
FITNESS

The holidays can be a challenging time of year for many, especially when you are watching what you eat and focusing on having balanced meals.  During this time, it can be hard to control what food you’re served, alcohol is abundant, and it can be difficult to refrain from binging when everyone else is loading up on treats.

Here are a couple of “tips” to get you through this Holiday season:

  • Start the day off with a modest breakfast and eat light snacks throughout the day.
  • Eat close to your usual times to keep your blood sugar steady. If your meal is served later than normal, eat a small snack at your usual mealtime.
  • If you are a guest in someone else’s home offer to bring a dish that you know fits into your meal plan,
  • Don’t skip meals. It will be harder to manage your blood sugar, and you’ll be really hungry and more likely to overeat.
  • If you slip up, get right back to healthy eating with your next meal. Don’t punish yourself, beat yourself or shame yourself.
  • Begin the meal by eating your vegetables first! Eating fibrous vegetables can balance your blood sugar and fill you up a lot faster-leading to less snacking and mindless eating.
  • Eat slowly. It takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to realize you’re full.
  • Eat mindfully.  Be aware of what you are eating.
  • Avoid or limit alcohol. If you are having alcohol have it with food.
  • There are no bad foods. Select your favourite foods and enjoy them in reasonable quantities.  Savour a small serving, especially if it is something that you do not eat often.
  • One piece of pie will NOT destroy your progress.  Remember that life is to be enjoyed and sticking rigidly to a meal plan at times is not a sustainable lifestyle choice.

The Black Panther Workout: Train like the true warrior of Wakanda!

The Black Panther Workout
FITNESS

Are you ready for the highly anticipated release of Wakanda Forever?

We are so excited to see how Marvel Studios will conclude Phase 4 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) and how this story fits into the upcoming Phase 5. 

In honour of the November 11th release day of Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, we want you to train like Wakanda’s mightiest hero.

The Black Panther Workout Routine

Training Volume – 3 days per week

Explanation:

There are 3 days of programmed training, but this routine is pretty tough but effective and will leave you sore and wanting more.  

What you need to know:

Circuit training means you’re performing movements in groups. If a movement is part of “Circuit 1” it’s part of the grouping of movements that needs to perform back-to-back and then proceed to break and do another set [of those movements] after. 3 rounds of each Circuit and then 2 minute break. 

Day 1 – Cardio/Pull/Core

  • 15 min cardio (row, run, bike)
  • Circuit 1: Box Jumps: 3X20
  • Circuit 1: Renegade Row Burpees: 3X10
  • Circuit 1: Jump Rope: 3X1 min
  • Circuit 1: One Arm Dumbbell Row: 3X10(each)
  • Circuit 1: Chin Up: 3X10

2 min Break

  • Circuit 2: Hammer Curls: 3X10
  • Circuit 2: Pull Up: 3X10
  • Circuit 2: Wall Slide: 3X10
  • Circuit 2: Toes to Bar: 3X10
  • Circuit 2: V-Ups: 3X20

2 min Break

  • Circuit 3: Wall Plank Hold: 3X1 min
  • Circuit 3: Walk to Plank: 3X10
  • Circuit 3: Reverse Superman Hold: 3X1 min

Day 2 – Cardio/Push/Core

  • 15 min cardio (row, run, bike)
  • Circuit 1: Box Jumps: 3X20
  • Circuit 1: Thrusters: 3X10
  • Circuit 1: Jump Rope: 3X1 min
  • Circuit 1: Dumbbell Bench Press: 3X10
  • Circuit 1: Push ups: 3X20

2 min Break

  • Circuit 2: Dumbbell Fly: 3X10
  • Circuit 2: Dips: 3X20 
  • Circuit 2: Dumbbell kickback: 3X10(each)
  • Circuit 2: Diamond Push Ups: 3X10
  • Circuit 2: V-Ups: 3X20

2 min Break

  • Circuit 3: Wall Plank Hold: 3X1 min
  • Circuit 3: Walk to Plank: 3X10
  • Circuit 3: Reverse Superman Hold: 3X1 min

Day 3 – Cardio/ Legs/Core

  • 15 min cardio (row, run, bike)
  • Circuit 1: Box Jumps: 3X20
  • Circuit 1: Clean + Squat + Press: 3X10
  • Circuit 1: Jump Rope: 3X1 min
  • Circuit 1: Deadlift: 3X10
  • Circuit 1: Pistol Squats: 3X10(each)

2 min Break

  • Circuit 2: Goblet Squats: 3X10
  • Circuit 2: Walking Lunges: 3X10(each)
  • Circuit 2: Single Leg Deadlift: 3X10(each)
  • Circuit 2: Hip Thrust 3×10
  • Circuit 2: V-Ups: 3X20

2 min Break

  • Circuit 3: Wall Plank Hold: 3X1 min
  • Circuit 3: Walk to Plank: 3X10
  • Circuit 3: Reverse Superman Hold: 3X1 min

To customize programming and help improve the strength, stability, and flexibility, consult with one of our Personal Trainers in club and complete your Game Plan Session.

WAKANDA FOREVER!

Beat Aches and Pain with These Exercises to Strengthen Your Lower Back

FITNESS

Ready to take the pressure off your lower back? The key to beating low back pain is to build up the right kind of strength and we’re here to help you. 

Your core muscles—not just your abdominals, but the muscles that wrap around your midsection—support your spine and lower back. Your core, hips, glutes, and hamstrings together form one big stability machine, so weakness in any one of those muscles forces the others to pick up the slack. 

Now that we know the information around causes of low back pain, here are some special workouts and stretches that target your lower back so that you can reduce muscle strain and other pain. 

Elbow Plank

Sets: 5 | Reps: 30-second hold per set | Load: Bodyweight | Rest: 45-60 seconds between sets

  • Get on the ground, with your stomach on the floor
  • Prop yourself up on your elbows and lift your knees off the ground
  • Tighten your quads and glutes and continue to push through your elbows and lifting your chest
  • If you can’t do 30 seconds, start with 10 seconds [or] start with 15 seconds and then work your way up

Side Plank

Sets: 5 | Reps: 30-second hold per set | Load: Bodyweight | Rest: 45-60 seconds between sets

  • Lying on your side, stagger your feet so there’s no pressure on your heels
  • Come up onto your elbow into the side plank position, keeping your lower hip high off the ground and the core engaged
  • Push through your elbow and pack that shoulder blade back
  • If you can’t do 30 seconds, start with 10- or 15-second holds and work your way up gradually

Glute Bridge

Sets: 5 | Reps: 15 | Load: Bodyweight | Rest: 45-60 seconds between sets

  • Lie faceup on the floor with knees bent, feet flat on the floor, arms resting at sides
  • Squeezing your glutes, lift your hips until your body forms a straight line from shoulders to knees
  • Pause for 3 seconds, and then lower back down to the starting position

Hip Stretches

Sets: 4 | Reps: 12 | Load: Bodyweight | Rest: 45-60 seconds between sets

  • Kneel on your left knee and place your right foot forward, with your right knee bent
  • Pull your left foot upward toward your butt and hold it for 10 seconds. 
  • Repeat the exercise with the right leg

These are just a few exercises to help strengthen your lower back. To customize programming and help improve the strength, stability, and flexibility of your lower back, consult with one of our Personal Trainers in club and complete your Game Plan Session.

How to Stay Cool with Outdoor Workouts

FITNESS

With the summer heat in full swing and outdoor workouts becoming more commonplace, it’s important we stay safe in the heat and sun while raising our heart rates!

It’s important to remember that when the temperature is higher our body struggles a bit more to recover in between exercises. If you own a device that measures your heart rate you may even notice that it doesn’t drop as quickly.

When the air is really hot and humid it becomes harder for your sweat to evaporate and cool off your body and so you have to take some extra measures to help your body keep itself cool.

Here are some tips and considerations for your next outdoor sweat session:

  1. Sweat Wicking Clothes/Materials

Sweat wicking clothe are important in any weather, but with the heat and humidity it is especially important. Firstly, these materials tend to be much more breathable and lighter, so you aren’t trapping heat inside of your clothing.

Secondly, clothes made of just cotton or polyester with absorb your sweat and make you feel uncomfortable and extra hot.

  1. Wear Lighter Colours

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that darker colours will make you feel hotter. Therefore, opting for lighter coloured tops and bottoms when going out for your outdoor workout is a great decision.

  1. Hydrate before and throughout

When you sweat you lose water, so it’s important to replenish, but it’s also important to go into your workout already well hydrated!

Make sure you’ve had some liquid in the day before starting your workout and aren’t s

  1. Look for shade to cool off

Find a shady spot and either workout in the shade or use it as a resting place in between your sets is a good way to help regulate your body temperature and also stay away from the sun’s harmful rays.

You can also use this shady spot to store your water and snacks!

  1. Early morning or late evening workouts

One of the best strategies is to stick to early mornings or late evenings once the sun has gone down or has not yet reached its peak. Although not every morning or evening is cool, it is still a little easier to get moving when the sun isn’t directly shining at you.

Always remember to listen to your body and do only as much as you can handle while taking frequent breaks to cool off, rest and hydrate. Bring some electrolytes as back up in case you feel unwell and remember to reapply sunscreen!